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Saturday, May 24, 2014

EDIBLE WEED : PART 6

PEGAGAN

Pegagan (Centella asiatica),  in Indonesia  this plant commonly known as rendeng, panegowang or antanan.
This plant, is a small, herbaceous, and is native to wetlands in Asia.
It is used as a medicinal herb.
It is also known as the Asiatic pennywort or Indian pennywort.
Pegagan grows in tropical swampy areas.
The stems are slender, creeping stolons, green to reddish-green in color, connecting plants to each other. 
The rootstock consists of rhizomes, growing vertically down. 
They are creamish in color and covered with root hairs.
 

Pegagan grows along ditches and in low, wet areas. 
Sometimes it grows between the stone on the pathway.

In Indonesia the leaves are used for traditional salad; 'sayur urab' or steamed with 'sambal' (ground chilli sauce).
This leaf is used for preparing a drink or can be eaten in raw form in salads.


Pegagan is promoted for its health benefit.
It is widely used as a blood purifier as well as for treating high blood pressure, for memory enhancement and promoting longevity. 
Pegagan is well  known as one of the main herbs for revitalizing the nerves and brain cells. 
This plant also used to treat urination disorder, kidney infection, skin irritation and also acne problem.
Eastern healers relied on pegagan to treat emotional disorders, such as depression, this plant has relaxing effect.


Sometimes I make a herbal tea from this plant.
I collect the leaves, and then dried.
I want to get more benefit from this weed.
Have you ever seen this weed on your garden?

8 comments:

  1. You ought to write a book as you have such a depth of plant knowledge.

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    1. Oh please.... I have to learn more about any useful plants. I have to improve my knowledge before I write a book. I really want to write a book, I hope I can realize it as soon as possible.

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  2. Seems an extremely useful 'weed'!

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    1. Yes, you're alright. A very useful plant.

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  3. I haven't seen that one here, too cold I guess.

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    1. Yes, I think so. Too cold also too dry

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  4. I wish that we utilized plants like this more in the US for medicinal purposes! I agree with the above comment...you need to write a book about this!!! I do not believe in medicine and would rather use things from nature to stay healthy. Thank you for teaching me something new!! Nicole xo

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    1. Yes, I'm sure our nature provide everything that we need. I'm sure everyplant is useful and have so many benefit for us. But may we don't know about it yet.
      Thank you Nicole, I have to prepare all contents seriously, then I can write a quality book.
      Have a nice weekend

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