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Wednesday, January 22, 2014

LOW COST URBAN GARDENING - PART 4

COMPOSTING

Make your our compost... it's a must!


All organic materials from our garden will 'back' to our garden.
We use kitchen scraps and garden scraps for compost.
We can use plastic bucket, pallet, pile or box as a compost bin.


All organic materials from our home and garden be a great compost.
After pruning  or trimming, we always get an abundant scraps.
So ... we harvest materials for compost.



We produce 'scraps' every day, and mostly are organic.
I provide two trash bins in my kitchen, for organic and inorganic scraps.
I separate the trash earlier.
So it make me easier to make compost.
How about you friend?

 

14 comments:

  1. I love the top photo of your compost bin, I have three plastic compost bins but really want to change them for wooden bins that look like beehives. No time to do it last year but I do want it done this. Our local compost collects any cooked food waste too so that gets composted elsewhere.

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    1. Sounds interesting. Beehives compost bin have better aeration. In tropics climate, good aeration in composting will make the process faster than usual.

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  2. I have a compost bin but it doesn't do much in our cold weather but we have the 4 legged compost machines that recycle plant material into manure so that makes up most of the organic material that I put on the garden in winter. I will often add some manure to the compost as it adds bacteria to the mix and attracts insects that help it all break down.

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    1. You have do a good job. Add some manure on the composting process will improve nutrients on our compost. So, we will get a high quality compost.

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  3. I compost in the spring/summer months. I don't do so much in the winter.

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    1. I'm sure you have a great job in composting. Winter is a rest time for your compost bin.

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  4. You've reminded me that I have to turn my compost and see if there's any useable stuff at the bottom. I've got a beehive wooden compost bin - it aerates through the side panels so it never smells - but the snails get in and I can see slime trails all over the waste! I'm impressed by the amount of compost that you make and also like your terracotta composter in the top photo!

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    1. You find snails on your compost bin, me too. I also find a lot of big earth worms inside the bin. The high humidity and the earth worms make the composting process become faster.

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  5. It is more difficult to compost in a colder climate, and you need space to keep the bins and to turn the content of them. I have opted to let my council get my garden waste, they come and collect for free and make beautiful garden compost from my waste. I have however been thinking of making leaf mold, that takes about 2 years in my climate but doesn’t require any turning or special consideration, just collecting leaves and then leave it to process.

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    1. Sounds great, so organized. Of course your garden look so neat, so tidy. Make leaf mold maybe suitable in the autumn, just collect the fallen leaves, and let them turn to be a leaf mold.

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  6. I'm really enjoying that series. I make my own compost too!

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    1. Thank you Magali. Yes, of course you do.

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  7. I look forward to spring so I can compost again!!

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    1. Yes, of course you have an abundant material for compost

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